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Sharing a Difficult Journey: The Art Installations of Serge Alain Nitegeka

Wordpress Blogs on Refugees - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 19:01

How do we break cycles of violence? Art helps us share painful personal stories and build empathy across cultural lines.

Serge Alain Nitegeka

Serge Alain Nitegeka was born in 1983 in the African nation of Burundi. When he was eleven years old his homeland erupted into open conflict between the Tutsi and Hutu tribes, violence that devastated Burundi and neighboring Rwanda. The two countries had been a single nation, Ruanda-Urundi, until 1962, and the longstanding animosity between peoples recognized no boundary.

On April 6, 1994, a plane carrying the president of Burundi, Cyprien Ntaryamira, and the President of Rwanda, Juvénal Habyarimana was shot down. These were not the first assassinations in the region and the backlash was fierce. The Hutu led governments began to execute Tutsis and moderate Hutus in an attempt to secure peace by killing all possible dissenters. Those who did not perish began a shadow existence, unable to move back home or establish a future anywhere else because of the prejudice that dogged them and their lack of legal standing.

Black Subjects, 2013
Video available here.

Nitegeka was one of these refugees, fleeing the genocide behind him and trying to eke out a life for himself. As he moved throughout Africa, he constantly had to bow to the conditions set for migrants in different countries, the catch-22 situations that meant he couldn’t relax anywhere. His journey to freedom would take a decade and leave scars and impressions on his internal landscape and imagination. He has found a way to express the darkness and pain of those years of wandering by making art.

Nitegeka’s work displayed as part of Venturing Out of the Heart of Darkness, 2015

Nitegeka, who now lives in Johannesburg, South Africa, makes a living as an installation artist, combining sculpture, design, construction, painting and performance art. Most of his pieces feature beams of black wood arranged in such a way that they impede movement. Visitors must find their way through by stooping and stepping over and through obstacles. This is Nitegeka’s way of creating empathy, sharing the feelings he felt as a refugee, remembering a time when he constantly had to modify or retrace his movements in order to survive and hold on to his sanity and humanity.

Performance means that the body is ‘directed': this installation directs you in a manner that prompts your body to rehearse and perform certain movements, puts you into my position. I’m sharing my story with you, and you’re completing it as a performer. The installation can be interpreted as a stage.

Black Lines, 2012
image © Jay Caboz

It is an obstacle course, intended to express the idea of liminality. It’s is as if I am saying, ‘That is not how you’re going to walk in here, THIS is how you have to walk here’. Avoiding the lengths of wood as one negotiates the space is like an enforced ritual: one’s movements are, to a large extent, broken up into a set of prescribed parts and paths: that is a ritual process.

–Serge Alain Nitegeka, Interview for Artthrob

You may read the entire interview here.

Obstacle 1, 2012

Nitegeka has won numerous awards and has exhibited his work at the Dakar Biennale in Senegal, numerous galleries in South Africa and the Armory Show and Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York City. His work is featured in Venturing Out of the Heart of Darkness, an exhibition currently showing at The Harvey B. Gantt Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, exploring the impact of colonialism upon identity. This week he will be opening a new solo exhibition, Configuration in Black, at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) in Georgia.

What a tremendous journey and what a brave and noble means of working through one’s past!

 All photos used in accordance with Fair Use Policy.

 

 

التصنيفات: Blogs About Refugees

Mediterranean: Major ‪rescue op: 1,000 migrants in 10 vessels in difficulty between island of Lampedusa & Libya's coast - 130 saved so far - Published 150215 2330z (GMT/UTC)

Wordpress Blogs on Refugees - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 18:37
15 February 2015 Last updated at 19:41 (GMT/UTC) Bid to save at least 1,000 migrants in Mediterranea
التصنيفات: Blogs About Refugees

UNICEF donates educational materials to internally displaced children - Nigerian Tribune

Google News - "internally displaced" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 18:00

UNICEF donates educational materials to internally displaced children
Nigerian Tribune
The United Nations Children Education Fund (UNICEF) in collaboration with the the Federal Government ,has presented educational materials to internally displaced children of Borno State, studying in various camps of the IDPs. Presenting the materials ...

and more »
التصنيفات: Google News

UNICEF donates educational materials to internally displaced children - Nigerian Tribune

Google News - "internally displaced" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 18:00

UNICEF donates educational materials to internally displaced children
Nigerian Tribune
The United Nations Children Education Fund (UNICEF) in collaboration with the the Federal Government ,has presented educational materials to internally displaced children of Borno State, studying in various camps of the IDPs. Presenting the materials ...

التصنيفات: Google News

Ozolua set to rehabilitate internally displaced people - Nigerian Tribune

Google News - "internally displaced" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 18:00

Ozolua set to rehabilitate internally displaced people
Nigerian Tribune
Ms MODUPE Ozolua, Chief Executive officer (CEO) of Body Enhancement Foundation, a non-governmental body has embarked on a three-day informative visit to Gombe State. During the visit to many temporary camps and host communities harbouring the ...

التصنيفات: Google News

UN must designate Camp Liberty a refugee camp, British lawyers demand

Wordpress Blogs on Refugees - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 17:21

Source: mojahedin.org

The medical siege on Camp Liberty in Iraq that houses Iranian dissidents must end and the residents be designated as refugees by the United Nations , British lawyers have demanded in a letter to the UN.
Kirsty Brimelow, chairwoman of the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales (BHRC), wrote to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon to express her ’deep concern’ at the inhumane conditions being endured by Iranian dissidents at the camp.
She said in a strongly-worded letter: ‘The government of Iraq has consistently failed to meet its obligations to respect the humanitarian and human rights of these refugees and to provide them with security and protection as agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding signed in 2011 with UNAMI. As a result the refugees have been targeted by numerous deadly missile attacks.
‘The Iraqi authorities are also imposing a cruel medical siege on the camp, denying the refugees free access to medical services. This is contravention of article 14 of the UN International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights that Iraq ratified in 1971.
‘As you will be aware this has prompted condemnation from international medical organisations who consider that the siege is putting the lives of the refugees at stake. It is believed that 23 people have died so far as a result of this medical siege.
‘BHRC has condemned on several occasions the attacks against unarmed refugees both at Camp Ashraf and Camp Liberty, including those perpetrated by Iraqi security personnel and also militias affiliated to the then Prime Minister al-Maliki. We understand that a total of 136 residents have been killed in such attacks with many more wounded.
‘In addition to the constant fear of attack and the lack of access to medical care, the refugees face severe economic hardship. Despite the assurances given both by the UN and the US that the refugees could sell their moveable and unmovable assets in Camp Ashraf, they have not been allowed to do so and, worse, many of them have had their property looted by militias affiliated with the Iranian regime without any protection from the Iraqi Government. The intention was that the assets in Camp Ashraf should be sold to provide necessary funds for relocating the residents.
‘In view of this deplorable situation we ask that Camp Liberty be recognised as a refugee camp under the supervision of the UN High Commission for Refugees. We also call on the UN and international community to take necessary measures to ensure that the Iraqi Government puts an end to the siege on the camp and guarantees the refugees’ unrestricted access to medical services, and their right to be able to sell their assets.’
The medical siege on Camp Liberty in Iraq that houses Iranian dissidents must end and the residents be designated as refugees by the United Nations, British lawyers have demanded in a letter to the UN.
Kirsty Brimelow, chairwoman of the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales (BHRC), wrote to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon to express her ’deep concern’ at the inhumane conditions being endured by Iranian dissidents at the camp.
She said in a strongly-worded letter: ‘The government of Iraq has consistently failed to meet its obligations to respect the humanitarian and human rights of these refugees and to provide them with security and protection as agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding signed in 2011 with UNAMI. As a result the refugees have been targeted by numerous deadly missile attacks.
‘The Iraqi authorities are also imposing a cruel medical siege on the camp, denying the refugees free access to medical services. This is contravention of article 14 of the UN International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights that Iraq ratified in 1971.
‘As you will be aware this has prompted condemnation from international medical organisations who consider that the siege is putting the lives of the refugees at stake. It is believed that 23 people have died so far as a result of this medical siege.
‘BHRC has condemned on several occasions the attacks against unarmed refugees both at Camp Ashraf and Camp Liberty, including those perpetrated by Iraqi security personnel and also militias affiliated to the then Prime Minister al-Maliki. We understand that a total of 136 residents have been killed in such attacks with many more wounded.
‘In addition to the constant fear of attack and the lack of access to medical care, the refugees face severe economic hardship. Despite the assurances given both by the UN and the US that the refugees could sell their moveable and unmovable assets in Camp Ashraf, they have not been allowed to do so and, worse, many of them have had their property looted by militias affiliated with the Iranian regime without any protection from the Iraqi Government. The intention was that the assets in Camp Ashraf should be sold to provide necessary funds for relocating the residents.
‘In view of this deplorable situation we ask that Camp Liberty be recognised as a refugee camp under the supervision of the UN High Commission for Refugees. We also call on the UN and international community to take necessary measures to ensure that the Iraqi Government puts an end to the siege on the camp and guarantees the refugees’ unrestricted access to medical services, and their right to be able to sell their assets.’

التصنيفات: Blogs About Refugees

India needs a proper debate on the Land Act - Daily Mail

Google News - "forced migration" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 17:19

Daily Mail

India needs a proper debate on the Land Act
Daily Mail
As the division of a family agricultural land leads to unviable holdings for a family to wreak a living out of it, forced migration to cities by young adults looking for jobs takes place leading to growth of slums with its known consequences. The Modi ...

Australian Academy of Science issues report debunking misinformation on ... - Sierra Leone Times

Google News - "human security" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 16:54

Sierra Leone Times

Australian Academy of Science issues report debunking misinformation on ...
Sierra Leone Times
Climate change has impacts on ecosystems, coastal systems, fire regimes, food and water security, health, infrastructure and human security. Impacts on ecosystems and societies are already occurring around the world, including in Australia. The impacts ...
Global WARmingBusinessWorld Online Edition

all 39 news articles »
التصنيفات: Mainstream News on Refugees

Article on HLP rights and durable solutions in GPC Digest

Wordpress Blogs on Refugees - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 16:23

by Rhodri C. Williams

A short piece I wrote on the relationship between ‘housing, land and property’ (HLP) rights and durable solutions for displaced persons has been published in the Global Protection Cluster Digest, vol. 1/2014, and can be accessed in pdf form here. I have also added the last draft before final edits just below.

The thrust of the piece will be pretty familiar to any regular readers of this blog. I’ve been going on about the steady demise of the Pinheiro Principles and their exclusive focus on restitution (over other forms of reparation) for some time now. As precedents like the ECHR Demopoulos decision and humanitarian changes in tack like the IDP Durable Solutions Framework crowded in, it became ever more clear that a more balanced approach was justified.

Indeed, even before the spike in global displacement seen since 2011, growing awareness of the problem of protracted displacement had put local integration front and center in international discussions of durable solutions. Where displacement persists because return is not on the table, continuing to emphasize the future hope of restitution can distract both displaced persons and host communities from practical steps to ameliorate the here and now. Meaning that a more balanced approach was also necessary.

My most comprehensive academic treatment of these themes came with the chance to write a chapter on restitution at the nexus of humanitarian response and transitional justice discourses in a 2012 volume published by ICTJ. But the most practical insights came with research for NRC the same year on how to secure tenure security for protracted IDPs in Georgia as well as Palestinian refugees in Lebanon.

The focus on security of tenure, rather than restitution represented a clear effort to develop approaches that responded to realities rather than rhetoric surrounding the situation and future prospects of both groups. But in a nutshell, the research showed that meaningful local integration is complicated even where the political will exists (Georgia) and well nigh impossible where it did not (Lebanon). And in both cases, asking hard-pressed humanitarian workers to develop expertise in areas like landlord-tenant law or housing finance and urban planning was a stretch.

I suspect that my sponsors at NRC were far from surprised that one of my main recommendations was to build bridges with development actors, which is in fact what they have done with aplomb. And returning to the latest issue of GPC Digest, the overall trend toward development partnerships in favor of durable solutions oriented toward forms of local integration appears to have strengthened significantly. So much so that some of the initiatives mentioned in the Digest such as the 2014 Solutions Alliance appear to have moved beyond loaded discussions of outcome (return or integration) altogether, favoring an emphasis on criteria for processes (flexible, evidence-based, partnership-oriented).

Although it is clear where this new approach is coming from, the pragmatic departure from specifying any favored durable solutions or even mentioning them at all seems slightly desperate. Surely local integration by any other name would smell just as politically controversial? But given the shrinking parameters within which humanitarian response is operating, who am I to second-guess?

————-

Housing, Land and Property in connection with Durable Solutions

Where property issues were nearly invisible during the Cold War-era development of international refugee law, they burst onto the scene as part of the response to the global crisis of internal displacement in the 1990s. The link between HLP rights and durable solutions was forged with the inclusion of restitution in the 1998 Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement. However the high point of HLP advocacy came with the 2005 adoption of dedicated standards on restitution for the displaced, the Pinheiro Principles.

In the last ten years, however, there has been a sea change in how the link between HLP rights and durable solutions are understood. While property rights undoubtedly remain a central anchor of durable solutions, the emphasis on restitution of lost property espoused in earlier guidance has been quietly abandoned, with equal or greater emphasis now placed on development-oriented, prospective interventions to secure access and secure tenure to land and housing. Understanding the reasons for this change can help in assessing its implications for humanitarian action.

The inclusion of restitution in the IDP Guiding Principles was one of the boldest assertions of the new rights-based, protection-oriented approach to humanitarian assistance. The Guiding Principles reframed forced displacement as a human rights violation and proposed restitution of lost property as the primary legal remedy. At the same time, restitution was also seen as a practical precondition for durable solutions amid a nearly exclusive focus on repatriation and return. Practice in Bosnia, where 200,000 properties were returned to displaced owners in accordance with the 1995 Dayton Peace Agreement presented evidence that restitution was practicable even under difficult post-conflict circumstances.

The subsequent retreat from restitution to a broader view of HLP issues in displacement has taken place for a number of related reasons. Most obviously, the success in Bosnia has been difficult to repeat in other contexts. In protracted displacement situations, meaningful restitution and return are often dependent on political resolutions, and may not be achievable even then. Development actors note that restoring pre-displacement property relations may either be impracticable (where landlessness was widespread) or undesirable (where unjust or unsustainable land relations were a root cause of conflict). These actors have called for a greater emphasis on transforming property relations, with corrective restitution-based approaches as the exception rather than the rule. And from both a protection and a human rights perspective, there is greater awareness of the need for sensitivity to the needs of host communities, as well as the rights of some occupants of claimed property.

While development actors provide an important analysis, their greatest contribution may yet come in the form of field partnership. Humanitarians cannot address these politically and technically complicated issues on their own. HLP approaches based on the pooling of available humanitarian, human rights and development expertise may represent the best path to realistic and fair durable solutions.

التصنيفات: Blogs About Refugees

Revealed: indefinite detention of asylum seeker is based on conviction secured ... - The Guardian

Google News - "asylum seeker" - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 16:19

The Guardian

Revealed: indefinite detention of asylum seeker is based on conviction secured ...
The Guardian
Revealed: indefinite detention of asylum seeker is based on conviction secured by torture. Exclusive: Sayed Abdellatif faces a lifetime of indefinite detention in Australia because of an adverse Asio assessment relying on evidence from an Egyptian ...

House and Home, Time Travel, Beware of lemon Meringue Pie

Wordpress Blogs on Refugees - أحد, 2015/02/15 - 16:06

Been thinking about the place we call home and the question: is it where we were born ? Is it where you grew up ? Is the house you make your own ? My instant feeling  is -it’s my house now. I feel it is always there for me, is my silent, reliable supporter. Specially when I’m coming home from far away, I say ‘Hello house, and have it reply ‘Hello there’.  And meeting up with Max the dog again, my house mate. My partner used to quote the lines of an old song: ‘Home is where the heart is, where the heart is, that’s where home is’…. Memories of previous houses echo in my mind, a bit faded and remote, without the vivid colours of now. Yet the previous houses reside in my imagination, and make the shapes of what I like now in a house, so they haven’t really gone away. Reckon that the style I favour for my house is a direct inheritance from my childhood home – sort of ‘arty clutter’. I marvel at minimalist white interiors with one tasteful chair, for their spacious ambience. And can’t imagine living there, feeling cosy. I used to know a Czech couple, Ivana and Jeremy, who fled Czechoslovakia after the Russian invasion of their country. They lived first in Canada, then Germany, where I went to visit them. Together we watched an American film on t.v., dubbed into German, which Ivana translated in to English for me. As refugees, they needed to learn English and German, whereas I only speak English. They said how, after 20 years or so away from Czechoslovakia, they felt like strangers wherever they lived. ‘Foreign’ on return visits to ‘as was’ Czechoslovakia, ‘foreign’ in Canada and Germany. I think they found home in each other, a tightly knit world of two. Time Travel ‘Ginger and Rosa’, 2012, a film directed by Sally Potter. The story centres around two young women, who’ve known each other as babies and are best friends. Also around Ginger’s parents and their relationship. It is set in the late 60’s, and casts a cool eye on how Ginger’s parents behave, in terms of the ’60’s values’. Ginger and Rosa as older teenagers have freedom to party, experiment with sex, supported by Ginger’s father, challenged by Ginger’s mother. Ginger joins CND and Ginger’s father starts a sexual relationship with Rosa. I remember being in CND and caring a lot about the Bomb. I remember thinking that I ought to be less hung up about social rules, and believing that men and women were equal. From the perspective of now, the film creates a narrative in which men are dominant, women’s identity is defined by pleasing men, and parents act like children, leaving their children unprotected and having to find their own way, bleakly. In terms of time travel, hindsight, it’s powerful and compassionate. Beware of Lemon Meringue Pie Overheard in the Pharmacy the other day : ‘She’s allergic to lemon meringue pie. I could see that her cheeks were swelling up, she wouldn’t stop eating it. After twenty minutes she looked like a hamster’. The antidote apparently is a lemon sherbet sweet. I know allergies can be serious, but this one caught my imagination.

التصنيفات: Blogs About Refugees

الصفحات

تسجيل دخول المستخدم

مناقشات

مرحبا بكم في المناقشات لشبكة الباحثين في شؤون الاجئين على الانترنت
يجري الآن من 23 أبريل ألى 7 مايو 2014: ما هي الآثار المترتبة على حقوق الإنسان وفهمنا لقانون اللاجئين؟
كيفية المشاركة في المناقشات.
اهتمام أخرى
"انت لست مستضعف بما فيه الكفايه " - حالة النزوح في المناطق الحضرية في ليبيا

تجميع البحوث والشبكات

مجموعات
بحث في خاص الاحتجاز و اللجوء
نوع الجنس والجنسية (GSC)
العمر و الجيل في سياقات من الاجئين بحث
النزوح البيئي
المنهجية و إنتاج المعرفة في الهجرة القصريه المحتوي بحث
بحث القانون الدولي للاجئين
مجموعات الارشيف

شبكات

اسيا المحيط, اتصل الهجرة القصرية (APFMC)
امريكا الاثينيه شبكه و الهجرة القسرية (LAFMN)
شبكه علماء جديد
شبكه السياسة العالمية

خريف 2013 شبكة الباحثين في شؤون الاجئين النشرة الإلكترونية حاليا متوفر!

سبل العيش في الصراع: السعى ل سبل العيش by اللاجئين و تاثير على الامن البشري من المجتمعات المضيف (2002)

الاقتصاد المنزلى وسبل العيش بين اللاجئين العراقيين في سوريا (2011)